It's a poorly hidden fact that I love Kubernetes. After spending months running everything from Marathon DCOS and CoreOS to Rancher and Docker Swarm in production, Kubernetes is the only container orchestration platform that has truly struck me as truly "production ready" and I have been running it for the past year as a result.

While functionality when I first started using it (v1.4) was somewhat patchy and uninteresting, some of the more recent updates have been making sizeable strides towards addressing the operations challenges we face on a daily basis.

With v1.8, Kubernetes has introduced the CronJob controller to batch/v1beta1, making it generally available for people to play with. Sounds like the perfect time to show you how we use CronJobs to manage automated, scheduled, backups within our environments.

Continue reading

Patterns for APIs

If you've built a production API before, you'll know that they tend to evolve over time. This evolution is not only unavoidable, it is a natural state that any active system will exist in until it is deprecated.

Realizing and designing to support this kind of evolution in a proactive way is one of the aspects that differentiates a mature API from the thousands that litter the Wall of Shame.

At the same time, it is important that your API remains easy to use and intuitive, maximizing the productivity of developers who will make use of it.

Continue reading

One of the most interesting discussions to have with people, notably those with traditional database experience, is that of the relationship between an off the shelf RDBMS and some modern NoSQL document stores.

What makes this discussion so interesting is that there's invariably a lot of opinion driven from, often very valid, experience one way or another. The truth is that there simply isn't a silver-bullet database solution and that by better understanding the benefits and limitations of each, one can make vastly better decisions on their adoption.

Continue reading
Docker's LogoDocker's Logo

Docker is become an incredibly prevalent tool in the development and operations realms in recent months. Its combination of developer friendly configuration and simple operational management make it a very attractive prospect for companies and teams looking to adopt CI and CD practices.

In most cases, you'll see Docker used to deploy applications in much the same way as a zip file or virtual machine image. This is certainly the most common use case for Docker, but by no means the extent of its functionality.

In this post I'm going to discuss some of the more interesting problems we've used Docker to solve and why it serves as a great solution to them.

Continue reading
Aurelia's LogoAurelia's Logo

Aurelia is a modern web application framework in the spirit of Angular, with an exceptionally concise and accessible developer experience and standards compliant implementation. It is hands down my favorite web framework right now and one I'd strongly recommend for most projects.

One of Aurelia's greatest claims to fame is the incredible productivity you can achieve, enabling you to build a full web application in just days, if not hours.

When building the application becomes that fast, spending a day putting together your deployment pipelines to roll out your application becomes incredibly wasteful, so how can we avoid that?

Well, Docker offers us a great way to deploy and manage the life-cycle of production applications. It enables us to deploy almost anywhere, with minimal additional effort and in a highly reproducible fashion.

In this post I'll go over the process of Dockerizing an existing Aurelia web application built with WebPack, however the same process applies to those built using SystemJS.

Continue reading

With the increasing popularity of Git as a tool for open source collaboration, not to mention distribution of code for tools like Go, being able to verify that the author of a piece of code is indeed who they claim to be has become absolutely critical.

This requirement extends beyond simply ensuring that malicious actors cannot modify the code we've published, something GitHub and its kin (usually) do a very good job of preventing. The simple fact is that by adopting code someone else has written, you are entrusting your clients' security to them - you best be certain that trust is wisely placed.

Using Git's built in support for PGP signing and pairing it with Keybase provides you with a great framework on which to build and verify that trust. In this post I'll go over how one sets up their development environment to support this workflow.

Continue reading

Anybody who has worked in the development world for a significant portion of time will have built up a vast repertoire of abbreviations to describe how they solve problems. Everything from TDD to DDD and, my favourites, FDD and HDD. There are so many in fact that you'll find a website dedicated to naming and shaming them.

I'm not one to add another standard to the mix... Oh who am I kidding, let me introduce you to Chance Driven Development.

XKCD Standards

Continue reading

Inki

in Projects

Inki is a small proof of concept project I've been working on which is designed to manage transient, single-use, SSH keys for an automated remediation tool our team is in the process of building.

In this blog post I'll go over some of the design decisions motivating a tool like Inki, some of its interesting implementation details and the questions we're hoping it will allow us to answer.

Continue reading

If you haven't yet read the article on Bash CLI then go read it now.

Bash's ability to automatically provide suggested completions to a command by pressing the Tab key is one of its most useful features. It makes navigating complex command lines trivially simple, however it's generally not something we see that often.

Bash CLI was designed with the intention of making it as easy as possible to build a command line tool with a great user experience. Giving our users the ability to use autocompletion would be great, but we don't want to make it any more difficult for developers to build their command lines.

Thankfully, Bash CLI's architecture makes adding basic autocomplete possible without changing our developer-facing API (always a good thing).

Continue reading

If you're just looking to hop straight to the final project, you'll want to check out SierraSoftworks/bash-cli on GitHub.

Anybody who has worked in the ops space as probably built up a veritable library of scripts which they use to manage everything from deployments to brewing you coffee.

Unfortunately, this tends to make finding the script you're after and its usage information a pain, you'll either end up grep-ing a README file, or praying that the script has a help feature built in.

Neither approach is conducive to a productive workflow for you or those who will (inevitably) replace you. Even if you do end up adding help functionality to all your scripts, it's probably a rather significant chunk of your script code that is dedicated to docs...

After a project I was working on started reaching that point, I decided to put together a tool which should help minimize both the development workload around building well documented scripts, as well as the usage complexity related to them.

Continue reading
Author's picture

Benjamin Pannell

SRE working on one of the planet's largest entertainment franchises.


Site Reliability Engineer


Dublin, Ireland